Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Fall’ Category

Local Lovelies: Persimmons

local texas persimmon greenling.com

Second only to peaches, persimmons are my favorite local fruit.  Find them at farm stands or CSA boxes in the fall.

local texas persimmon greenling.comLittle Sister devoured more than her allotment!  Big Brother was on the fence but liked the few slices he tried.  You can taste the sunshine in these orbs, slightly sweet with a hint of diluted apricot.  I’ll be hunting for persimmon trees (if I can manage to keep it alive long enough to bear fruit!).

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

2011-10 lemon poppy loaf 2

We were at a friend’s house this weekend to celebrate Mike’s birthday.  Friend of friend Sam made Avgolemono for everyone.  She graciously allowed me to share her recipe for this lemon egg soup, which was amazingly tangy and silky. A flavorful soup is one that takes time, love and affection. Like raising a child, you have to watch it carefully, give enough to keep it going, and know when it’s time to let go. A poignant analogy as many parents I know have let their chicks out of the nest to join the collective (a.k.a. college). My aunt is probably freaking out right about now as my youngest cousin begins his college career. Boy, do I feel old saying that!

Anyways, on to the soup!

Sam described creating the foundation of the soup with a homemade chicken stock. You can find posts here and here which discuss stock. For this soup, a simple mirepoix and a roasted chicken will suffice. Over a period of 8 hours, the stock should be watched, more water added as needed to extract every bit of chicken flavor from the carcass of a lemon-rosemary roasted bird. Keep the breast meat aside, but everything else can be used for stock. If you don’t have all day to make soup, you’re forgiven, go ahead and use the box or cubes instead. You’ll need 10-12 cups of stock. This will make 8-10 servings, depending how hungry y’all are.

Add shredded breast meat to the stock. Simmer while you work on the next step.

Get 1 cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 10 lemons), less if you’re making less soup.

Separate 6 eggs. Set aside the whites (make a lemon meringue pie or something!). Whisk the yolks then add small amounts of stock from the soup to temper the eggs.

Add the lemon juice to the tempered yolks while whisking.

Turn the temperature down to a bare simmer. Slowly incorporate the yolks into the soup. Adjust the salt if needed.

OPTION: For people who can eat gluten, some cooked orzo may be added to this soup. Sam left it separate from the soup so everyone could choose to add some (or not) to their respective bowls. You can cook the pasta in the stock for 10 minutes before adding the chicken meat as well.

Thanks Sam for sharing your soup!

Read Full Post »

chop drop soup

This is not so much a recipe as it is a map or method to creating soul satisfying soup in five easy steps.  Let your imagination go wild, with the blessing of your taste buds of course.  Soups are a perfect way to use seasonal veggies that you may find at your local farmers market.  Say there is an unusual squash on the table, ask the grower if it is hard, bitter, sweet, or soft?  Bitter squash is not the best candidate for soups, at least in my view, so I avoid those.  Zucchini is about as bitter as I will go.  Give chop and drop a try!

Step 1

Empty the veggie drawer into the (clean) kitchen sink or counter.  Wash all skin-stay-on veggies.

Step 2

Peel and trim veggies.  Chop into manageable pieces.  Hint: the smaller the dice the hastier it cooks!

Step 3

Drop into a soup pot with a swirl of olive oil, sprinkle of salt and pepper.  Stir.

Step 4

Add liquids.  Choose your favorite stock, broth, bouillon, OXO, Knorr, or even tomato puree, or can of cream of whatever plus milk.

Step 5

Wait.  Poke the veggies to see if they are tender. Heck, you could even taste one or two.

You are ready to eat!

Read Full Post »

Recently I started ordering local organic foods through Greenling.com  and my first box included a container of cubed butternut squash.  This is a rather hard squash and I appreciated the preparation so that I could dive right in and start playing.

I roasted the squash with an equal amount of organic Gala apples seasoned lightly with salt and pepper.  I steamed a cup of couscous (which is a pasta not a grain just so you know) and shook up an olive oil dressing in a recycled caper jar.  Here is the recipe I wrote down:

  • approx. 4 cups cubed butternut squash
  • 4 small Gala apples, cored and cubed
  • 1 cup couscous, steamed for 20-25 minutes
  • 1/3 cup dried currants
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 5-6 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon cardamom

Roast squash and apple with a light coating of olive oil, salt and pepper at 375ºF for 25-30 minutes.  Toss in a large bowl with steamed couscous and dried currants.  In a small jar combine the vinegar, oil, salt and spices.  Cover with the lid and shake to emulsify.  Adjust seasoning if needed (you want the dressing a little strong because the salad will muddle it slightly) and toss into the salad.  Serve warm.

Serves 4 to 6 people as a side.

 

Read Full Post »

This recipe has been under development for a couple years, this one was pretty close to what I want.  The cream cheese was what I had in the fridge, this should be a mozzarella blend of some kind.  This was already an experiment so the cream cheese went in.

  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 6 oz cream cheese
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 15 oz can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1 15 oz can cream of Poblano soup
  • 1 (28 oz) can green beans
  • 1 (30 oz) jar cactus strips
  • french fried onions

350ºF for 45 – 55 minutes until bubbly and onions are browned on top.  Kinda like this:

Read Full Post »

The local kiddies got cookies with treat bags tonight.  I hope they were enjoyed and not tossed out.  It’s sad  that people can’t trust each other anymore… Would you bake or let your kids eat something like this?  No high fructose corn syrup in the cookies, by the way.

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Start Halloween with a toasted scary cat or spooky ghost to dip into runny yolks.

Use cookie cutters to cut out the shapes from the middle of sliced bread (any kind you would eat with eggs).

Put butter in the pan over medium-low heat.  Once it melts put the cut bread in the pan.  Let the first side toast for about 30 seconds then carefully pour an egg in the “hole” in the toast.

Season with salt and pepper then gently flip the egg and toast together.  Season the second side and cook until the white is set but the yolk is soft or runny. (Note:  cook until the egg yolk is set if serving small children)

Alternatively, before adding the egg flip the toast while empty.  Add the egg then cover the pan with a lid.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »