Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘shrimp’

Of all the things to run low on, salt should never be one of them. I kept thinking the box of little crystals would continue providing this essential ingredient.  To say the least, we’ve been on a low-sodium diet lately.

That is until today.  Finally remembered to pick up salt at the store, two canisters: regular salt and sea salt.  Why both?  Well I have my own OCD tendencies in the kitchen, besides being burly and over bearing on anyone else who might try to cook in it.

Regular salt is used in baking.  Since baking typically involves mixing so many different ingredients, you can’t tell me you would know that chocolate muffin was made with regular salt or sea salt.  If you can, your palate should be used on Iron Chef or something.

Sea salt is used in cooking.  If the precious rock crystals run out, thou may substitute regular salt.  Sea salts, in my opinion, are less harsh on the tongue, a softer salt flavour if that makes sense.  Sea salt is a must for caramel popcorn.

So tonite’s dinner was surf ‘n’ surf and could have been doused in sea water.  I put way too much sea salt on the poor fish fillets, I think I double salted them.  Try eating very little salt for a week and then eat salty chips, you mouth will be on fire and you’ll be looking for the nearest water fountain.  That was pretty close to the sensation after eating this plate.  I need to pay more attention when cooking fish, too much of anything will overpower a thin fillet.  Salmon stands up a bit better to my cooking style and is forgiving.  Thank you Njord!

  • 1 fillet of white fleshed fish per person
  • 1/3 lb shrimp per person
  • 3 large garlic cloves, sliced
  • 3 Tbsp butter per pound of shrimp
  • olive oil
  • garlic powder
  • onion powder
  • sea salt

Sprinkle fillets with garlic powder, onion powder and sea salt on both sides, easy with the salt there cowgirl.  Heat olive oil briefly in a pan, sear both sides of the fillets.  Hold fish in a warm oven.  Melt the butter in the pan.  Add the shrimp in a single layer, add the garlic and sea salt to taste.  Flip the shrimp once, they should be “C”s and opaque when finished cooking.

Serve with rice and/or salad.

Read Full Post »

Shrimp Tacos

We drove out to see the Grandparents over the long weekend for Big Brother’s birthday.  I decided to run to the store to pick up a cake to save us from the heat of the oven during the hottest Labour Day weekend I’ve ever seen.  I enjoy browsing different grocery stores, you never know what you might find or what might inspire an awesome snack.  Enter Shrimp Tacos.

The idea was simple.  Spice up some shrimp and add fresh avocado slices, wrap up in a toasty tortilla… Voilà lunch is ready!

shrimp, red bell peppers, cilantro, lime juice

Toss cleaned shrimp in your favorite Cajun spice blend.  Slice up a red bell pepper and chop cilantro.  Cut a lime in half.

Heat a skillet over a medium-high flame.  This was a cast iron skillet, I gave it a bit of oil.  Cook the shrimp and red bell pepper together, turn the shrimp half-way.  The shrimp should curl but not to the point of making “O”s.  Turn off the heat, juice the lime over the pan and sprinkle with cilantro.

shrimp tacos

If you can wait long enough, assemble as tacos with avocado.  Enjoy 🙂

Read Full Post »

This post was featured on Freshly Pressed in Jan 2011!

If you have ever travelled near the Texas-Mexico border and stopped at a repurposed snow-cone shack for a cup of shrimp cocktail and wondered what the heck was in it, keep reading.  Even if your travels have never brought you this way, read on.

Apparently, there is a difference between what Canadians consider to be a shrimp cocktail, and what my southern family thinks this should be.  An argument that could start a year-long debate was averted by accepting that a rose by any name would still smell as sweet,  and a shrimp would taste as scrumptious. 

The Canadian version, as I will refer to it, consists of big cooked shrimp and a tomato-based horseradish sauce.

To my family here in the south, shrimp cocktail looks more like ceviche.

Either way you want to prepare a spicy and fresh shrimp appetizer suits me just fine, what matters is enjoying the time spent with those sharing the food.

Here’s how to prepare the two variations of shrimp cocktail seen above.

The Canadian Version

You will need big shell-on shrimp (10-15 per pound size, ask your fish guy), depending on how much your crowd loves them, buy 3-5 per person or what you can afford.

Simply clean the shrimp by removing the shell, keeping the tails on so you have a handle for dipping.  I find the easiest way is to gently fold at the seam of the tail section, the connective shell structure will pop so that the body portion can be removed without ripping the tail apart.  I always remove the digestion tract (I won’t eat shrimp with it left in – ew).  Toss them in a little olive oil, salt and pepper and transfer to a baking sheet in a 400ºF oven for 10 minutes.  You can flip them over after about 7 minutes but they will cook just fine on their own.

The dipping sauce for this cocktail consists of the following:

  • horseradish (from a jar, creamed is fine)
  • chili sauce (also jarred, I found it next to the Dijon mustards at my local grocery)
  • Ketchup
  • fresh lemon juice
  • Worcestershire sauce

Mix equal parts of the chili sauce and ketchup in a small bowl.  Add about a tablespoon of fresh lemon juice, or a light squeeze of half a lemon.  Add a few dashes of Worcestershire sauce and stir to incorporate.  If you like a fiery shrimp dip add a good amount of the horseradish, if you are not partial to the heat you can leave it out entirely and still enjoy yourself.  I added 3 teaspoons of horseradish and everyone loved it, however we tend to like heaps of wasabi on our sushi as well.   

The Mexican Version

Under the direction of mom, I was tasked with the appetizer to our family gathering.  She called it shrimp cocktail and then went on listing the ingredients I would need to prepare the dish.  My hubby and I looked at her quizzically – do you mean ceviche?  No, it’s shrimp cocktail.  It was like trying to explain that a crepe and a pancake are in fact two different things, however they do share some of the same ingredients and look pretty similar.  Just let it go, I thought.  All I wanted to do was eat, and helping in prep means we eat all that much sooner.

This version has a few more ingredients than the road-side original.  In no particular order, you will need:

  • 4 cups of cooked baby shrimp, the frozen ones work great
  • 6 – 8 Roma tomatoes, finely diced
  • 2 large avocado, cubed
  • 1 white onion, finely diced
  • 1 – 2 roasted Poblano peppers, diced
  • 6 Serrano or jalapeño peppers, diced
  • 1 bunch cilantro (about 1/2 cup when chopped)
  • 1/2 Orange pop bottle
  • juice of 2 limes
  • 1 cup ketchup
  • big pinch of salt

Toss everything in a large bowl.  You can make this ahead of the party but leave out the cilantro and avocado until serving time. 

Spoon into glasses and provide tortilla chips and crackers for munching.

Read Full Post »

Cevicheladas

After a long day and sleepness night I was about ready to hit the sack when Hubby surprised me with a secret ingredient. “I’m Iron Chef-ing you!” he invited. All I wanted to do was go to bed. With the last ounce of energy in my body I opened the fridge. The secret ingredient was shrimp.
Suddenly the wheels started moving and my tummy rumbled. I wasn’t alone. Little Sister crawled over to my leg and started pulling, cursing me for withholding her sippy cup full of milk. Hubby and Big Brother took off to the hair salon around the corner and left me to my imagination, pots and pans.

I started assembling ingredients to figure out what I was going to make.

Looks like enchiladas!  I started with what you would put in a ceviché plus a few other things, corn, bell pepper, and Epicure® Fajita spice blend.

And cheese (of course)

The shrimp were tossed in the Fajita spices.  Corn was added to the pico de gallo, along with the finely diced green bell pepper.  Pour a little enchilada sauce into a casserole dish, then line up tortillas filled with shrimp, pico, and cheese.  Top with more sauce and cheese.  Bake at 375°F for about 25-30 minutes.

Read Full Post »